OFFICIAL SELECTION / INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION   FIDMARSEILLE 2013

world premiere

   

ANAK ARAW
ALBINO

 

Gym LUMBERA

 

 

PHILIPPINES/USA
2013
B&W
Super 8, 16 mm, 35 mm
70’

Original version
No dialogue
Image
Danilo Salas III
Sound
Moki Mcfly
Editing
Jet Leyco, Gym Lumbera
Casting
Jay G. De la Vega, John Griffiths, Feliciano Lumbera, Rodrigo Magpantay, Franco Guiseppe Cuozzo, Banda 24

Production
Barong Tagalog

Filmography

– ETA, 2012
– TAGALOG, 2012
– ENGLISH, 2012
– TAGLISH, 2012
– CLASS PICTURE, 2011
– DAHIL SA’YO, 2010

Gym Lumbera is a famous great magician, the cinematographer of a new generation of major Filipino filmmakers including, Sherad Anthony Sanchez, John Torres and the like. The hypersensitivity these directors manage to impress on film owes a lot to his talent; you might call it an archive sensitivity: it seems as though the only light that can shine through it is the fierce brightness of some long-gone celestial body. For his first feature film as a director, Lumbera stayed true to his heartfelt interests. His frames look as though they had been salvaged from wreckage. His images are translated... from the past. The whole film is about translation, really. With the idea of going from one bank to the other, from one age to the next, from stillness to movement, from one register to another — scabrous to lyrical, for instance. Nevertheless, Lumbera’s approach is far from innocent, the translation isn’t balanced, it is marked by the violence of colonisation and schizophrenia. The film’s title translates as “Sun-Child”, in other words, albino. As if overexposed by light itself, a whiter-than-white man is convinced that he has a son living in the United States, and he tries hard to learn English, immersing himself in a dictionary. Obviously, even if Lumbera says that the central theme is autobiographical, the film is first and foremost a fable about language, fate and the quest for his country’s identity. (Jean-Pierre Rehm)

FaLang translation system by Faboba