OFFICIAL SELECTION / INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION   FIDMARSEILLE 2013

World premiere / first film competition

   

TONIGHT AND THE PEOPLE

 


Neil BELOUFA

 

 

FRANCE/USA
2013
Colour
HD 2K
80’

Original version
English
Subtitles
French
Photography
Guillaume le Grontec
Sound
Jordan Miller, Arno Ledoux, Benjamin Laurent
Editing
Ermanno Corrado
Casting
Tony Audin, Joseph Bastian, Cibi Boomer, Sumiko Braun, Willis Cooks, Katie Davies, Cheryl Fidelman, Al Gerschutz, Alexandra Godinez, Bruce Harnishfeger, Gabriel Herrera, Kat Johnston, Trip Langley, Eve Lima, Michael Malcolm, Vince Romo, Alex Rotaru, Curtis Tyrone Scott, J.-T. Vancollie, Bryce Wieth

Production 1 distribution
Petit Film

Filmography
– KEMPINSKI, 2007
– SAYRE AND MARCUS, 2009
– BRUNE RENAULT, 2010
– SANS TITRE, 2010
– THE ANALYST, THE RESEARCHER, THE SCREENWRITER, THE CGI TECH AND THE LAWYER, 2011
– PEOPLE’S PASSION, LIFESTYLE, BEAUTIFUL WINE, GIGANTIC GLASS TOWERS, ALL SURROUNDED BY WATER, 2011
– WORLD DOMINATION, 2012
– PARTY ISLAND, 2012
– REAL ESTATE, 2012

“In an imaginary Los Angeles, a bunch of cow-boys, a group of activists, three hippies, four teenagers and a few gangsters are waiting for a major event that is supposed to happen tonight. Meanwhile, they talk about their values, dreams, ideal lovers, and about how politics affect their lives.” Such is the synopsis of Neil Beloufa’s first feature film, the lengthy and logical follow-up to several short films, including the beautiful Kampinski (2007). But it should be added that this heterogeneous and unbelievable reunion is caught in a rigorously ordered net. With sitcom-like flat lights, deliberately artificial settings, recorded depthless voices uttering edited dialogues from previous interviews, stereotyped cast and mechanical acting, nothing strays out of line, life has deserted the place, leaving physical shells to their fate as puppets. Although the project lies somewhere between a sociological survey (it crudely reports the emptiness of truisms actually recorded) and a study of imaginary representations (it piles up clichés of social positions dictated by and reproduced on TV), the outcome of this detailed work is something altogether different. Realism turns into fancy. Because the apocalypse all the characters are waiting for has already happened, and we are actually in Hell.

Jean-Pierre Rehm

FaLang translation system by Faboba