FIDMARSEILLE 2003

PARALLEL SCREENS

 

CAMERA NOVA

For many years now, the documentary has had an attraction that goes beyond the borders fixed solely by television’s law of distribution. New tools and resources, the inherently modest cost involved in this genre, and the concern for political commitment have motivated an increasing number of film-makers to risk taking this road – which they widen with success. Wishing to escape the mechanisms that can deprive the documentary of ambitions that are intended to be unpredictable, such experiments involve the requirements of other perspectives, other paces, and other forms of questions. So, far from drawing the borders of a new ghetto – no matter what label it would be presented under – this programme of films is firstly concerned with giving voice to a conviction. Which conviction? Nowadays, the documentary appears to be the surviving remains of the cinema’s utopia. To be precise, the films and the movements that run through them should aim at one same goal: turning the world on its head.
The films in this programme all show this overturning, each in its own way. Politically, in Alejandra Riera’s Hot Water, Bernadette Corporation’s Get Rid of Yourself, or in sequences of Florence Lazar’s Les Femmes en noir, Sociodrame, and Otpor. Lovingly, in Arnold Pasquier’s series with the explicit title Tous ont besoin d’amour [They all need love], in Erik Bullot’s family archive Oh oh oh !, in Thomas Bauer’s Hear Mud in your Eye, in Noëlle Pujol’s VAD, or in Paola Salerno’s two interviews. Or they are even descriptive or landscape films, such as Ariane Michel’s Après les pluies, or Hans van Den Broeck’s Our Circumscribed Days.
But this categorisation is unjust, because all these works, sharing the perspective of a renewed world, are necessarily overlapping. This is why these films are not made by professionals of a genre: they are the fruit of many different approaches that find their sources here and there, from militant activism, choreography, photography and the visual fine arts, and so on. Some of them are not even “signed” at all, except under the pseudonym of a collective (such as Bernadette Corporation). Or they are presented as a work in progress rather than a finished film (e.g., Alejandra Riera). One single imperative unites this diversity: they are all selfproduced. This has known consequences: it enables the film-maker to simplify procedures and to present radical ideas.
To repeat ourselves, what is the aim of such a programme? It is not so much the anthological pretension of a so-called “newness” and its pompous gesticulating, but rather an insistence: the selected films should present singular actions and gestures, or a singularity that is finally what Giorgio Agamben calls “ordinary”, but without which no lucid vision has a chance of finding its own new way.

Jean-Pierre Rehm 

 
APRÈS LES PLUIES / It rained
Ariane Michel
France, 2003, 8’
OUR CIRCUMSCRIBED DAYS
Hans Van den Broeck
Belgium, 2000, 76’
OTPOR / Resistance
Florence Lazar
France, 2002, 12’
   

TOUS ONT BESOIN D’AMOUR (BARCELONA)
Arnold Pasquier
France, 2003, 20‘

VAD (VISITE À DOMICILE)
Noëlle Pujol
France, 2002, 25’
SOCIODRAME
Florence Lazar
France, 2002, 5’
   
GET RID OF YOURSELF
Bernadette Corporation
France & USA, 2003, 63’
SORELLE LAMBERTI / CANCELLIERE PRESTIA
Paola Salermo
Italy, 2003, 24’
HOT WATER - DE L’EAU CHAUDE
Alejandra Riera
France, 2000, 30’
   
OH OH OH !
Érik Bullot
France, 2002,
LES FEMMES EN NOIR
Florence Lazar
France, 2002, 11’
HEAR MUD IN YOUR EYE
Thomas Bauer
USA, 2002, 35’
   
  RÉALISATIONS (9 films courts)
Aurevoiretmerci, Two Michael Snow,
C’est ça l’amour ?, Telefonando,
Enchaînés, Montesanto, À l’envers,
 Le Train Bleu, Ça c’est l’amour.
Arnold Pasquier
France, 2003, 30‘
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FaLang translation system by Faboba