OFFICIAL SELECTION/ FRENCH COMPETITION   FIDMARSEILLE 2012

World premiere /GNCR competition, Renaud Victor prize & and Marseille Espérance prize

   

JAJOUKA QUELQUE CHOSE DE BON VIENT VERS TOI


Eric et Marc HURTADO

 

FRANCE, MAROCCO
2012
Colour
Super 16 mm
62’

Original version
French, arabic
Subtitles
French
Photography
Eric et Marc Hurtado,
Pascal Auffray
Sound
Ludovic Elias, Fred Maury, Jean-François Terrien
Editing
Justine Hiriart
Casting
Bachir Attar, Shiraz El Khairi, Amin Serhani, Ahmed Ettalha, Amin El Moutawafiq, Aicha asebban, Mohamed El Abboudi, Mohamed Konte, Ahmed Jilali, Yassin Hanae, Nora Larach, Chaimaa el Ouazzari.
Les enfants du village : Mohamed El Ghilani, Mohamed Slimani, Mohamed Serhani, Hamza Sliman, Wadii El Hamoudi
Les femmes du villages : Mennana El Attar, Saida el Hend, Habiba El Ouazari, Fetouma El wahabi, Fatma El Bouhsini ; Hamed Sahrani
Les Maîtres Musiciens de Jajouka: Mustapha Attar, Mohammed Attar, Adderrzak El Attar, Abdellah Bokhzar, Bouker Talha, Mokhtar Jahgdal, Mohammed el Hammadi, Lahcen Kaddouri.
With the voices of Bachir Attar et Eric Hurtado

Production
Atopic

The film opens with an archaic tale, in brief stylised tableaux, concerning the divine creation of music. The myth is extended to a universe of sacred dimensions where it is difficult to differentiate the legend from its current perpetuation. Where are we? In the Moroccan Rif, in Jajouka, a village where, for over two thousand years, fertility rites involving music and dance, have been presided over by Bou-Jeloud, “the Father of Skins”, a local version of the god Pan.
The Hurtado brothers are famous musicians: their group Etant Donnés came to prominence through collaborations with various artists including Alan Vega, Genesis P-Orridge and Philippe Grandrieux (they produced original soundtracks for several of his films). They are also known as experimental filmmakers. Here their two passions are combined, raising the challenge of travelling back in time to hail the Master Musicians of Jajouka, yesterday and today. Besides, has time passed? It is therefore not about concocting a score destined to accompany autonomous images, but about making the music (its strident nudity, its incantatory austerity) and its history the very substance of the images and the scenario being staged. Their choice was obviously Pasolinian: to resurrect the archaic while remaining faithful to it, through the treatment of decor, lighting, acting and costumes. Here, the beauty lies in the rough friction between the muteness of the characters and their unbridled momentum towards another potential voice.

Jean-Pierre Rehm

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